Do you have a stash of homemade dried beans, but are unsure what to do with them? I say “Pressure can them!”  No soaking or precooking required. First, this DIY project turns dried beans into a convenience food.  There have been many times when I’ve wanted to make a bean dish with homemade beans, but didn’t prepare with an overnight soak and cooking time.  Second, homemade canned beans are delicious. Unlike the tinny, slimy liquid you find in store bought cans, your homemade version will be clean and flavorful.  The broth is a treat in itself.  Finally, homemade canned beans are economical.  You can buy a can of basic beans for about $1 or better brands for over $2 each. Dried beans cost under a dollar per pound and can yield 4-5 cans per pound.

You will need a pressure canner.  Due to botulism concerns you cannot use a water bath canner to can beans.  A pressure cooker also cannot substitute for a pressure canner.  I bought my pressure canner at Amazon and feel it was a worthwhile investment if you want to can beyond tomatoes, pickles, and peaches.  Find the canner I bought here.

Preservation method: Pressure canning

Difficulty level: Experienced

Homemade Canned Beans

Dried Bean and Legume Amounts Per Jar*

Black Beans:   3/4 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 1 1/2 cups dried per quart jar

Kidney Beans: 1/2 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 1 cup dried per quart jar

Cannellini Beans: 1/2 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 1 cup dried per quart jar

Pinto Beans: 1/2 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 1 cup dried per quart jar

Navy Beans: 3/4 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 1 1/2 cups dried per quart jar

Red Beans: 1/2 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 1 cup dried per quart jar

Great Northern Beans: 1/2 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 1 cup dried per quart jar

Black Eyed Peas: 1/2 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 1 cup dried per quart jar

Garbanzo Beans (chickpeas): 3/4 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 1 1/2 cups dried per quart jar

Lima Beans: 1/2 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 1 cup dried per quart jar

Lentils: 1/4 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 1/2 cup per quart jar

Split Peas: 1/3 cup dried per pint jar -OR- 2/3 cup per quart jar

Prepare pressure canner and lids according to your manufacturer’s instructions 30 minutes before you begin canning.

Count how many jars you will use and measure out beans accordingly. Place beans in large bowl and sort through beans and toss any stones, debris or shriveled beans. Fill bowl with cool water and submerge the beans. Swirl the water with your hands and remove and discard any beans that float to the top.

Drain the beans and place the required amount of clean beans in jars according to the chart above. Cover with hot water leaving 1″ head space.  Carefully use a skewer or nonmetal spatula and work out the bubbles in the jars.  With a clean damp cloth, wipe jar rims and threads. Center lid on jar and screw band down until fingertip-tight resistence is met.

Place jars in canner, lock the lid, and bring to a boil on high heat. Vent steam from canner for 10 minutes. Place weight on vent. After the gauge indicates that the pressure is at 10 pounds of pressure begin timer and process jars for 1 hour 15 minutes (pint jars) or 1 hour 30 minutes (quart jars). Carefully monitor your dial the entire time.  If your reading dips below 10 pounds you must get your reading back up to 10 pounds and start your timer to zero again.

After full processing time turn off heat. Allow pressure to turn to zero naturally. When ready (according to your canner’s instructions), open vent.  Remove canner lid.  Wait 10 minutes, then remove jars, and cool for 24 hours undisturbed. Refrigerate and use any jars that do not seal properly.  Properly canned and sealed jars can be stored in the pantry for up to one year.  After one year you can still consume the beans, but they will have lost some nutritional value and taste.

*Handy quantity chart from “The Complete Guide to Pressure Canning” by Diane Devereaux.